Kniv med Restauration 1825-2025 på sliren. Håndlaget treskaft, håndsmidd knivblad og håndlaget slire av håndverker inkl. knivmaker Gunvald Olufsen. / Knife with Restauration 1825-2025 on the sheath. Handcrafted wooden handle, hand-forged blade, and handmade sheath by craftsmen including knife maker Gunvald Olufsen.

Restauration knives – handmade in Norway

A knife with “Restauration 1825-2025” engraved on the sheath. Handcrafted wooden handle, hand-forged blade, and handmade sheath by craftsman/knife maker Gunvald Olufsen in Farsund.


Knife with Restauration 1825-2025 on the sheath. Handcrafted wooden handle, hand-forged blade, and handmade sheath by craftsman including knife maker Gunvald Olufsen.
Handcrafted knife and sheath with Restauration. (Click to enlarge.)

A knife with “Restauration 1825-2025” engraved on the sheath. Handcrafted wooden handle, hand-forged blade, and handmade sheath by craftsman/knife maker Gunvald Olufsen in Farsund.

Handcrafted wooden handle in various types of wood and patterns. Possibility to get specially custom-made wooden handles from the family farm in Tysvær.


Knife with Restauration 1825-2025 on the sheath. Handcrafted wooden handle in various types of wood and patterns, hand-forged blade, and handmade sheath by craftsman including knife maker Gunvald Olufsen.
Handle in various types of wood and patterns. Click on the image for a larger size.

Possibility to engrave family names if desired. The picture shows both sheaths with 1825-2025 (at the bottom tip) and without. Knives are usually brought on board the “Restauration” at events and festivals for people to get a closer look at the fine craftsmanship. The knives are numbered.

Possibility to engrave family names if desired. The picture shows both sheaths with 1825-2025 (at the bottom tip) and without. Knives are usually brought on board the “Restauration” at events and festivals for people to get a closer look at the fine craftsmanship. The knives are numbered.

Albert Medhaug gave knife number 2 as a gift to John Isaksen in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, a former scallop fisherman with roots in Norway. The knife was used by the Norwegian Fisheries and Ocean Minister to open the photo exhibition about emigration from Karmøy to the USA aboard the “Restauration”.


Knife number 2 given as a gift in the USA.
Knife number 2 given as a gift in the USA.

John Isaksen received knife number 2 as a gift from Albert Medhaug on September 18, 2023, aboard his pleasure boat in Fairhaven, MASS. The knife had been used by the Norwegian Fisheries and Ocean Minister to open Albert Medhaug’s photo exhibition on board the “Restauration” about the emigration from Karmøy to the USA. John’s parents emigrated from Skudeneshavn and Hidra, Flekkefjord. Born in 1936 in Brooklyn, NY, John grew up in Fairhaven, where he and his father were scallop fishermen. John’s wife, Ellen Risdal Isaksen, born in 1938 in Tarrytown, NY, also has ties to Fairhaven. Her father, Nils, born in 1905, emigrated from Risdal, Skudenes, in 1924. Ellen’s parents, including her father who was a scallop fisherman, moved from New York to Fairhaven.

If you’re interested in purchasing a unique handmade and numbered piece, contact the knife maker directly.
Email: gunvald.olufsen@icloud.com (or call 906 54 671)

If you’re interested in purchasing a unique handmade and numbered piece, contact the knife maker directly. Email: gunvald.olufsen@icloud.com

Price for the “standard” model is NOK 1,450 (+ shipping costs). (For payments from abroad: IBAN/account number: NO40 6326 1214 395, BIC/SWIFT: NDEANOKK, Bank: Nordea Bank ABP Norway)


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More details about the handmade knives – information from knife maker Gunvald Olufsen:

Similar knives as shown in the pictures can be ordered with or without the year on the sheath, featuring the motif Restauration.

Wood types in the knife handle:
The wood types I use mainly consist of burls from birch (burl), oak root, and 4000-year-old oak found in a bog. These wood types can also be mixed together, as shown in the top picture (birch burl and black bog oak). All these wood types are hard, and the drying process takes over 1 year.

Cracks may occur during drying, but usually, the part of the material without cracks is chosen. Alternatively, one can choose a handle material with cracks for decorative purposes, and the cracks are then filled with liquid epoxy in various colors. Bog oak (used in the handle in the top picture): Wood submerged in bog water usually does not rot due to lack of oxygen. Carbon dating (C – 14 method) is used to date organic material, conducted by NTNU in Trondheim. I have not found out why the oak logs found in the bog were black, but it may be related to the reaction between tannic acid in the oak and the iron ore in the bog over thousands of years.

Sheath:
Made of rawhide leather. This means that the leather is not fully tanned but has a raw core in the middle. Rawhide leather is mainly used for tooling, which involves moving/shifting the leather during the drying process to create a raised motif. (Tanning is the process of converting animal hides into leather.)

Knife blade:
Consists of three layers of steel, with carbon steel in the middle. To bond the steel layers, it is heated to about 1200 degrees Fahrenheit (just before melting) and gently hammered together. This is called forge welding and is done in the smithy. A raw-forged knife blade means that the blade is not polished/smoothed but retains the texture from the hammering in the smithy.

Knives with Restauration as the motif can be ordered by contacting the knife maker directly. (All income goes directly to him.)